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Category: Fee Economics / Fee Market

Compare & Prove Hourly Rates with NALFA Survey

July 20, 2021

Every year, NALFA conducts an hourly rate survey of civil litigation in the U.S.  NALFA has released the results from its 2020 Litigation Hourly Rate Survey.  The survey results, published in The 2020 Litigation Hourly Rate Survey & Report, shows hourly rate data on the very factors that correlate to hourly rates in litigation:

  • Geography / Location / Jurisdiction
  • Years of Litigation Experience / Seniority
  • Practice Area / Complexity of Case
  • Law Firm / Law Office Size

This empirical survey and report provides macro and micro data of current hourly rate ranges for both defense and plaintiffs’ litigators, at various litigation experience levels, from large law firms to solo shops, in routine and complex litigation, and in the nation’s largest legal markets and beyond.  This is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive survey or study on hourly rates.  This data-intensive survey contains hundreds of data sets covering all the relevant hourly rate variables.  The survey was designed to aid litigators in comparing rates within a litigation peer group and proving rates in court and ADR.

The 2020 Litigation Hourly Rate Survey & Report is divided into two parts, a free public portion and a private portion.  The public portion contains only the survey totals.  The data-rich private portion has the complete survey results including the raw data responses with percentages.  The private portion is free to members of our network (i.e. members, faculty, and fellows) and the 2020 litigation survey respondents.  The private portion is available for purchase to others.     

This 2020 Litigation Hourly Rate Survey & Report is now available for purchase.  For more information on this, email NALFA Executive Director, Terry Jesse at terry@thenalfa.org or call us at (312) 907-7275.

10 Largest Class Action Attorney Fee Awards in U.S. History

June 20, 2021

A recent Bloomberg Law story by Roy Strom, “Meet the Professor Big Law Hires to Collect Nine-Figure Fees,” reports on attorney fee awards in the 10 largest class action recoveries in the U.S. have paid class counsel a range of fee when measured as a percentage of the settlement amount:

As stated in the article, there is no central authority to track class action settlements and attorney fee award data.  We at NALFA, would like to to be this authority.  As a non-profit group, we can worked with outside groups and individuals to promote and promulgate empirical research and data on attorney fee awards in a range of underlying litigation practice areas.

NALFA: Hourly Rates Above National Averages in Large Chapter 11 Cases

May 6, 2021

A recent The American Lawyer story by Dan Roe, “Kirkland and Weil’s Fees in Chapter 11 Work Highlight Big Law Allure to Bankruptcy,” reports that even as the number of commercial Chapter 11 bankruptcies has dropped in recent months, large bankruptcies have continued to churn out big fee packages for some law firms—one reason why firms are continuing to invest and hire in their bankruptcy practices.  For instance, a glance at law firm fees in two cases—the Chapter 11 bankruptcy of Sears, filed October 2018, and the May 2020 J.C. Penney bankruptcy—reveal the cases have totaled more than $150 million for law firms since they beganMost of the money has gone to Am Law 200 firms, with some partners billing for more than $1,500 per hour.

Representing Sears Holdings Corp., Weil, Gotshal & Manges emerged as the biggest fee-earner in the Southern District of New York bankruptcy case, with more than $80 million in fees and expenses paid through the end of February 2021. Its partners billed between $1,695 and $1,200 per hour, while associates charged $1,100 to $595.  Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld also made out big on the Sears bankruptcy.  Representing the bankruptcy’s unsecured creditors, the law firm received $48 million in total compensation through the end of February 2021 with a blended rate of $853 per hour.

Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, representing Sears, received almost $20 million, although most of it was completed before last year.  Its attorneys averaged $790 per hour, with partners topping out at $1,650.  And Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz did $873,000 worth of work representing Sears, with a blended rate of $1,287 and partners billing up to $1,500.  Meanwhile, the J.C. Penney bankruptcy has generated more than $28 million in fee revenue for law firmsRepresenting J.C. Penney, Kirkland & Ellis took most of the spoils with two massive fee applications totaling $20.9 million, with a blended attorney rate of approximately $1,000.

Cooley and Cole Schotz represented the creditor committee, with the former firm taking home $4.2 million in fee revenue with a blended rate of $970 average billing rate.  Cole Schotz earned $2.1 million for work it performed in the second half of the year, maintaining a $643 average hourly rate per attorney.  Katten Muchin Rosenman put in 1,318 professional hours to earn $1.1 million in fee revenue while representing J.C. Penney, averaging $960 per attorney per hour, while Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, representing the store’s subsidiaries, cleared $827,000 for its work in the second half of 2020, averaging just over $1,000 for its hourly rate.

The J.C. Penney restructuring also benefitted smaller-sized firms such as the New York law firm Herrick Feinstein, whose attorneys billed around $500 per hour for $1.5 million in fees.  The opportunity for large fee awards in Chapter 11 work continues to drive a flurry of bankruptcy partner hires.  In the last week, Willkie Farr & Gallagher added a three-partner bankruptcy group from Morrison & Foerster who represent creditor committees in high-profile cases and Sidley Austin hired Tom Califano, previously global co-chair and U.S. chair of DLA Piper’s restructuring group.  Last month, Kirkland brought on Christine Okike from Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom.

"Our analysis, from our most recent litigation hourly rate survey, shows that all these Chapter 11 bankruptcy rates are well above the approximate national averages," said Terry Jesse, Executive Director of NALFA.  "In fact, hourly rates in large Chapter 11 bankruptcies, may be one of the highest rate-charging practice areas, " Jesse wondered.

For more on NALFA's national averages, visit NALFA Releases 2020 Average Hourly Rates in Litigation.

Ninth Circuit Bumps Up Hourly Rate in Labor Case

April 19, 2021

A recent Law 360 story by Lauren Berg, “9th Circ. Bumps Ore. Atty’s Hourly Fee Rate in Labor Case,” reports that a U.S. Department of Labor administrative law judge wrongly reduced an Oregon attorney's hourly rate by $100 while awarding attorney fees in a Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act case, the Ninth Circuit ruled, telling the Benefits Review Board to assign the case to another judge.

In a 35-page published opinion (pdf), the three-judge panel said the review board should not have upheld the administrative law judge's decision to knock down attorney Charles Robinowitz's fee rate from $450 per hour to $349.85 per hour, finding that the attorney had presented "substantial evidence" that his requested rate was in line with similar services by lawyers of comparable skill and experience.  Robinowitz provided supportive affidavits from other attorneys, the 2012 Oregon State Bar Survey reporting that Portland attorneys with more than 30 years of experience billed between $300 per hour and $400 per hour, and court decisions awarding him $425 per hour and $420 per hour for work performed in 2012, 2013 and 2014, according to the opinion.

The fee appeal comes after Ladonna E. Seachris in 2006 filed a claim for benefits under the LHWCA following the 2005 death of her husband, who was injured while working as a longshoreman in 1979, according to court filings.  An administrative law judge denied the claim in 2010 and Seachris appealed to the Benefits Review Board, which affirmed the judge's order.  Seachris appealed again to the Ninth Circuit, which remanded the case in 2013, and the administrative law judge ruled in her favor in 2016, according to court records.

Following that decision, Seachris' attorney Robinowitz filed for attorney fees for 109 hours at a rate of $450 per hour, as well as costs of $5,413.  The administrative law judge in 2017, however, allowed the attorney 98 hours at about $341 per hour, according to court filings.  The Benefits Review Board then affirmed the decision, but increased the hourly rate to $349.85 because of an inflation error.

Seachris and her attorney then appealed to the Ninth Circuit. Seachris' husband's former employer, Brady-Hamilton Stevedore Co., said Robinowitz should only get an hourly fee rate of $358, arguing that the administrative law judge correctly calculated the market rate using the 2012 Oregon State Bar Survey, according to court filings.

In its opinion, the appellate panel said the judge erred by rejecting Robinowitz's evidence of prevailing market rates as outdated, saying reliance on historical market conditions is appropriate when it is the most current information available.  The panel said the judge needs to treat the parties equally, finding that both parties, as well as the judge, relied on dated evidence.

Brady-Hamilton also relied on the 2012 OSB Survey, the panel said, and the judge herself relied on that same survey as the linchpin of her rate decision.  By the time her fee decision came out in January 2017, the 2011 rates in that 2012 survey were already six years old, according to the opinion.  "The ALJ nevertheless relied on the survey by adjusting the 2011 data for inflation — appropriately so," the panel said. "But the ALJ declined to make similar adjustments to Robinowitz's evidence."

"We see no reason why she should not have taken the same approach to Robinowitz's evidence, and it was [an] error not to do so," the panel added.  The administrative law judge also erred by rejecting Robinowitz's evidence from the 2012 OSB Survey and not taking into account the way the survey reported rates, the panel said.  The survey reported hourly rates charged by Portland attorneys based on their years of experience, irrespective of practice area, and based on their practice area, irrespective of experience, according to the opinion.

Robinowitz relied on the survey chart based on years of experience to calculate his hourly rate, but the judge rejected the evidence as being too "one-dimensional," according to the panel.  But then the judge relied on the other survey chart based on practice area to determine her rate, the panel said.

"Although the ALJ rejected Robinowitz's survey evidence as 'one dimensional,' she proceeded to base her rate determination on the equally one dimensional chart reporting rates by practice area," the panel said.  "Even assuming arguendo that rates based on practice area are more probative than rates based on years of experience, the latter rates are at least relevant."  The panel found that the judge and the review board committed legal error in determining Robinowitz's hourly rate and that the judge's rate decision isn't supported by substantial evidence, according to the opinion.

The panel remanded the case and told the review board to assign it to a different judge, finding that "the tone of the ALJ's decision and the manner in which the ALJ evaluated the evidence suggest that the ALJ may not be able to provide Robinowitz with a fair and impartial hearing on remand."

The panel also noted that the Oregon State Bar has published an updated survey, saying the 2017 survey reports that Portland attorneys with more than 30 years of experience charged a median rate of $425 per hour in 2016 and for attorneys in the 75th percentile, the average rate was $495 per hour.  "These updated rates, which the BRB should take into account on remand, provide further support for Robinowitz's requested rate," the panel said.

Former AG’s Hourly Rate: $2,295

April 16, 2021

A recent Law.com story by Mike Scarcella, “Covington’s Eric Holder Bills at $2.295 Hourly, New Legal Services Contract Shows,” reports that Covington & Burling partner Eric Holder Jr., the Obama administration’s first U.S. attorney general and a veteran Washington lawyer, is billing at $2,295 hourly, according to a contract the law firm signed with a public university to conduct an internal investigation about workplace culture.  Holder is Covington’s lead partner on the legal services engagement with Oregon Health & Science University.  The school announced its retention of Covington in late March to lead a “comprehensive, independent investigation of institutional harassment, discrimination, retaliation and racism.”

Covington and other firms have long been hired to conduct internal investigations at companies and other institutions, but in many instances the engagement letters, revealing rates and the scope of legal services, are not matters of public record.  ALM obtained Covington’s contract through a public records request.  Holder’s $2,295 billing rate puts him at the high end of hourly figures.  Billing at other elite firms such as Weil, Gotshal Manges and Kirkland & Ellis have recently approached $2,000.

“Mr. Holder and Covington have conducted examinations of workplace culture and issues related to equity, diversity and inclusion for corporations including Uber, Starbucks and Airbnb,” the university said in announcing the retention of the Washington-based law firm.  The announcement noted that “Holder and the Covington team are also currently assessing race, equity, inclusion and diversity policies and practices at Seattle Children’s Hospital.”

Holder is working with Covington partner Nancy Kestenbaum, co-chair of the firm’s white-collar defense and investigations practice group and a former member of the firm’s management committee. Kestenbaum is billing at $1,445 an hour, the law firm’s engagement letter said.  Covington said it agreed to discount its rates by 10%.

“Hourly rates for other lawyers range from $595 for junior associates to $2,295 for senior partners; and for legal assistants from $290 to $545,” the firm said in its engagement letter.  The firm said it reviews and adjusts rates yearly as of Jan. 1, “although there are circumstances in which we may adjust rates at other times.”  Part of the contract contained information that the university would not release.  The information pertained to clients Covington is advising on clinical trials being conducted at the university.

“As you recognize, we are a large law firm with multiple practices in multiple offices throughout the world, and we represent many different clients in many different industries, including clients who are competitors of each other and sometimes adversaries in legal matters,” Holder wrote.  “In taking on this representation, we commit that we will not represent any other client in any matter adverse to you that is substantially related to this matter.”

A private law firm charging a public client is not rare.  Public records show major U.S. law firms have charged local or state government clients to take a case to the U.S. Supreme Court.  Not every engagement, however, is charged. Some work is done pro bono.