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Category: Hours Billled

Apple Urges Judge to Cut Fees in iPhone Class Settlement

August 26, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Piper Hudspeth Blackburn, “Apple Urges Judge To Trim IPhone Class Atty Fees” reports that Apple Inc. has asked a New York federal judge to lower a $6.6 million fee request from attorneys who helped secure a $20 million class settlement for iPhone users over device updates, insisting that there is a lack of documentation supporting the price tag.  While attorneys from Pomerantz LLP and Bronstein Gewirtz & Grossman LLC have asked for one-third of the payout for their services, Apple wants the award shaved by $666,000 to 30% of the total settlement, or exactly $6 million. The reduction, Apple argued in a brief, would provide an additional $600,000 to the class and give each member a payment of $68.56, up from $62.94 at the current number of claims.

Apple also took aim at the plaintiff's counsel's billable hours, calling their submission "insufficient."  According to Apple's memorandum, the class's counsel failed to submit any documentation that "substantiates" the over 10,000 hours they billed for the suit that lasted more than six years.  "Class Counsel merely provide a chart listing the names of billers, their requested hourly rate, and an aggregate number of hours each worked, with no elucidation as to whom did what," the motion said.

In an Aug. 12 motion for attorney fees, the plaintiff's attorneys said the fee is warranted given the number of hours they spent working on the suit and the expenses they incurred in the process – as well as the favorable outcome they achieved.  "From the outset, class counsel understood they were embarking on a complex, expensive, and likely lengthy litigation with no guarantee of ever being compensated for the substantial investment of time and money the case would require," the attorneys wrote.

Apple also asked the court to reduce the requested $2.8 million in litigation expenses and service awards of $15,000 for each named plaintiff.  Apple contends that a reduction of the amount of the plaintiff's service award is warranted because the plaintiffs would receive an award one hundred times greater than the maximum recovery afforded to class members.  Apple also took issue with the reported costs for meals, taxis and online research, which they said were not recoverable.

Attorneys Seek $13M in Fees in Pork Antitrust Settlement

August 22, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by PJ D'’Annunzio, “Attys Seek $13M Payout For Pork Antitrust Deal With Eateries reports that attorneys representing commercial pork buyers asked for $13.2 million in fees for their role in negotiating a $42 million settlement between a group of restaurants and Smithfield Foods in multidistrict litigation over an alleged meat industry scheme to inflate prices.  In a memorandum, a class of commercial and institutional indirect pork purchasers urged the court to award fees using a "percentage of the funds" calculation, in this case, 31% of the gross settlement proceeds.

"The $42 million settlement before the court is the result of extensive work done by counsel for the CIIPPs on a contingent basis," the memorandum said.  "Counsel has worked for over four years and have invested thousands of hours to pursue the CIIPP claims.  Counsel for the CIIPPs request an interim award of attorneys' fees for the work done to achieve this settlement."  Minnesota U.S. District Judge John R. Tunheim preliminarily approved the $42 million settlement between Smithfield and the pork purchasers in an April order.

In addition to the money, Smithfield agreed to cooperate in prosecuting claims against the remaining defendants, which include big names like Tyson Foods and Hormel Foods Corp., in the large-scale litigation.  The purchasers' memorandum said four years of litigation resulted in roughly 16,800 attorney hours and 2,560 hours for legal assistants and other professionals.

"Given the excellent results achieved, the complexity of the claims and defenses, the real risk of nonrecovery, the formidable defense teams, the delay in receipt of payment, and the substantial experience and skill of counsel, the requested multiplier on the lodestar and the resulting fee is reasonable compensation for the work done by counsel for the CIIPPs," the purchasers said.  Additionally, the purchasers asked for an award of $7,500 to each plaintiff representative.

Hagens Berman Earn $5.3M in Fees in Sasol Settlement

August 19, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Emilie Ruscoe, “Hagens Berman Nabs $5.3M in Fees Over Sasol Investor Deal” reports that attorneys who represented investors in South African energy and chemical company Sasol Ltd. will get nearly $5.3 million for their work on the case after brokering a $24 million settlement deal with the company to end claims it hid risks taken as it built a facility in Louisiana.  In an order, U.S. District Judge John P. Cronan said the investors' Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro LLP legal team could have 22% of the settlement fund and nearly $432,000 to cover their litigation expenses. Together, the attorney fee and the reimbursement sum total over $5.7 million.

"Lead counsel conducted the litigation and achieved the settlement with skill, perseverance, and diligent advocacy," the order states, adding later that the fee and reimbursement sums are "consistent with awards in similar cases."  Judge Cronan also said lead plaintiff David Cohn could have $20,000 and additional plaintiff Chad Lindsey Moshell could have $15,000 from the settlement fund to reimburse their "reasonable costs and expenses directly related" to the litigation.

The court's order comes a day after a final hearing on the proposed fee and reimbursement sums and adopts language proposed by the investors in July, when they filed the request for the attorney fees.  The order also noted that none of the members of the class had objected to the settlement sum, despite the fact that nearly 90,000 potential class members had been mailed notices about the final hearing, and that the attorneys spent an estimated 6,000 hours on the case since moving to become lead counsel in the matter in April 2020.

Should Judges Police The Gender Hourly Rate Disparity?

June 1, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Andrew Stricker, “Should Judges Police The Legal Industry Pay Gap?” reports that as the pay gap between male and female attorneys persists despite industry pledges to do better, the power of judges to potentially bridge the divide is coming into sharper focus.  Following an unusual decision by a federal magistrate, some members of the Philadelphia bar have endorsed the idea that other judges should follow suit and help police gender pay inequities, or at least call them out from the bench.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Timothy R. Rice recently issued the order critiquing elements of a notable employment firm's request and awards that put attorney "status" over performance.  "I don't think it's always my role, but in this instance, I felt I had to set the rates based on the performance of the attorneys who really tried the case, and not a rate that was maybe based more on age or seniority," Judge Rice told Law360 Pulse.

In April, Judge Rice was overseeing the last stage of an age discrimination case brought by Alison Ray, a former sales director at AT&T Mobility Services who was let go at age 49 after more than two decades at the company.  Following a five-day trial, Ray last year secured a $2.3 million award after a jury determined that a company restructuring plan had targeted older employees as "surplus."

In February, lawyers at the firm representing Ray, Console Mattiacci Law LLC, asked for $847,945 in "shifted" fees from AT&T.  That lodestar calculation, based on a 40% contingency agreement, was justified by the complexity of the plaintiff's case, Ray's counsel argued, as well as a "complete and total victory" on her claims that AT&T had willfully violated federal age discrimination law.  The fee petition included nearly 1,570 hours from partners Susan Saint-Antoine and Laura C. Mattiacci, a highly experienced lead trial counsel, and associate Daniel S. Orlow. Saint-Antoine and Mattiacci, who have practiced since 1989 and 2002, respectively, both listed their "usual and customary" rate of $730 an hour. Orlow, who has practiced since 2011, was at $320 an hour.

The petition also included 37 hours contributed by firm principal Stephen G. Console. Console, a nationally recognized employment law expert, charged $900 an hour for consulting on strategy decisions and filings, as well as settlement demands and other key elements of the case.  In an order granting a handful of reductions totaling about $83,000, Judge Rice said Saint-Antoine and Mattiacci should be entitled to the same per-hour rate as Console, who has been practicing for three decades.

"Historically, women in law earn less than their male counterparts, a discrepancy that may reflect hidden bias," he said, citing a 2020 report that found widening pay discrepancies at large law firms.  Referring to a fee schedule used widely in the Third Circuit to determine market rates for Philadelphia-area lawyers, Judge Rice said Saint-Antoine and Mattiacci should be in line for a "premium" over those numbers that put them in line with Console.  Even if the fee schedule "serves as a useful guide on setting hourly rates, its reference to experience should not serve as a cap that precludes exceptionally talented trial lawyers from receiving fair compensation simply because of age or gender," Judge Rice said.

The legal industry pay gap, and its role in women reaching firm leadership and a lack of diversity in many areas of the profession, has been under intense scrutiny for years, but without much in the way of real progress.  In the 2020 report cited by Judge Rice, legal recruiting firm Major Lindsey & Africa found that partner compensation soared between 2010 and 2018.  But in that same period, the pay disparity between male and female equity partners widened significantly, from 24% to 35%.

Nancy Ezold, a veteran Philadelphia employment lawyer, said it was "absolutely" appropriate for Judge Rice to consider rate disparities for lawyers in his court, even though AT&T counsel hadn't raised the issue in its fee-award opposition.  "I don't know of anything in the law that says you have to consider what a law firm pays people," Ezold said.  "But Judge Rice looks at the bigger picture and asks, 'Am I going to do something to perpetuate an inequality and authorize a fee for a male partner over two female partners who really handled this case?'"

Ezold, who once sued her own former law firm in the late 1980s for denying her a partnership based on her gender, argued that fee petitions often provide a substantive overview of who did what work over the history of a litigation.  Depending on the nature of the case, they can also be an opportunity for judges to compare requested rates across different firms and legal teams comprising different gender and experience makeups.

"Here the judge couldn't overlook a difference between male and female in this case because it related directly to the responsibility to decide what would be allowed for each of these attorneys," Ezold said.  "Judges speak out on a lot of things, and I don't see why this should be any different."  Judge Rice served as an assistant U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania before being appointed as a federal magistrate in 2005.  He retired in April, just after issuing the Ray opinion.

In an interview with Law360 Pulse, Judge Rice said the timing was coincidental, noting that the issue of male-female pay disparities had never before been "so squarely presented" to him in a fee petition.  "From the [fee] affidavits I see, and from all I know about law firm pay structures, I do think the pay gap is huge, and there are just so many variables out there that have cut against giving women equal pay," such as lack of trial experience and other opportunities to advance, he said.

"When I see lawyers perform in an exemplary fashion, it's appropriate they be paid at higher rates commensurate with their skills, not just based on the years they've practiced," Judge Rice added.  Alice Ballard, another veteran Philadelphia employment lawyer who provided a fee affidavit in the Ray case, said Judge Rice's prior time as a trial lawyer was evident in the opinion, including in his positive assessment of the hours Console Mattiacci dedicated to mock trial runs and other "essential" advocacy preparation.

Judge Rice "really understands what it means to prepare for a trial like this, and everyone on my beat really appreciates that," she said.  But Ballard took issue with Judge Rice's ultimate reliance on what she described as an outdated fee schedule, rates that don't well reflect the special skills of trial work, Mattiacci's successful track record or the contingency fee model.

She also cautioned against reading the opinion as a critique of the hourly rate request for Console, whom she called a "lion" of the city's employment bar.  Regarding his reference to the legal industry's gender pay disparities,"it's great that he took the opportunity to bring it up, but I just don't think it has much to do with this specific case," Ballard said.

Judge Cuts ‘Unreasonable’ $24M Fee Request in Mattel Settlement

May 23, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Katryna Perera, “Judge Cuts ‘Unreasonable’ Atty Fee Bid in $98M Mattel Deal” reports that a California federal judge has granted final approval to a $98 million settlement between investors and toymaker Mattel Inc. and PwC, but slashed the requested $24.5 million in attorney fees, saying it was too high.  U.S. District Judge Mark C. Scarsi said in his order that while the Ninth Circuit typically considers 25% of a settlement fund the "benchmark," that figure is still only a "helpful starting point," and courts should depart from it when a benchmark award would "yield windfall profits for class counsel in light of the hours spent on the case."

Instead of granting the requested $24.5 million in attorney fees, the judge reduced it to approximately $13.6 million, which represents about 14% of the $98 million settlement.  A 25% award would provide an "unreasonable windfall" to the class counsel, the judge added.  "The Court finds persuasive class counsel's arguments and evidence concerning the excellent value of the results achieved through settlement, the riskiness and complexity of the litigation, the skill and quality of counsel's work, the contingent nature of the fee, and the significant financial burdens counsel carried during the course of litigation," the order states.  "While these factors merit a significant fee award, an award of 25% of the settlement fund is unreasonable given the magnitude of the fund."

John Rizio-Hamilton, who represents the class and lead investor plaintiffs DeKalb County Employees Retirement System and New Orleans Employees Retirement System, had previously urged Judge Scarsi to approve the fee bid and maintained that the reasonableness of the fee request is backed by a lodestar cross-check, which he said yields a multiplier of 2.7.  Judge Scarsi agreed with Rizio-Hamilton's calculations and stated that the multiplier is within range of other resolved class actions with common fund settlements.  But the judge found that the requested multiplier in this case was "excessive … relative to counsel's performance."

"Counsel would reap an extra $15 million windfall … while counsel should be commended and compensated for the risk they took, the work they did, and the result they achieved, that outsized windfall would not be fair to the other interests in this case," the judge said.  Alternatively, Judge Scarsi's approved $13.6 million attorney fee award represents a 1.5 multiplier of the lodestar, according to the order, which the judge called "appropriate in light of the hours counsel spent on the case, the magnitude of the settlement fund, the results achieved, and the risks and burdens borne by counsel."

In addition to granting final approval of the settlement for the same reasons outlined previously when he granted preliminary approval, Judge Scarsi awarded $5,515 to DeKalb County Employees Retirement System and $3,100 to New Orleans Employees Retirement System as lead plaintiff service awards, as well as $1.1 million in litigation reimbursement to class counsel.