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Category: Hourly Rates

Insurer Asks Judge to Reduce Attorney Fees in Coverage Win

May 17, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Ben Zigterman, “Insurer Asks Judge To Nix Cleveland Bar’s Atty Fee Request” reports that Auto-Owners Insurance Co. told an Ohio federal judge that the attorney for a Cleveland bar should not be awarded $293,000 in fees and expenses it requested after winning a $1.2 million jury verdict over coverage for fire damage.  At most, the insurer argued in the filing, Daniel Shimko should get $91,000 for representing Blues to You Inc., which does business as Wilbert's Food & Music.

In April, a jury ruled in favor of Blues to You on its claims that Auto-Owners breached its contract and acted in bad faith, awarding the bar $1.2 million, including $375,000 in punitive damages.  The bar had accused Auto-Owners of failing to properly investigate and not fully covering its claims for fire, smoke and water damage from a 2019 fire, as well as water damage from a 2020 fire in a unit above the bar.

While the bar said the insurer made a "pitifully low offer" and "dragged its feet," the insurer argued that Blues to You misrepresented the value of its claims by duplicating losses from the first fire in its losses from the second.  After the jury ruled in its favor, the bar asked for more than $271,000 in attorney fees based on 706.2 hours of work at $385 an hour, plus about $21,000 in legal expenses.

"More than a little skill and experience in this field is paramount to successfully represent an insured in such a legal proceeding," the bar wrote earlier this month. "Plaintiff's counsel went beyond proving bad faith.  Plaintiff successfully proved that Auto-Owners acted with ill will in the manner in which it adjusted plaintiff's two claims."  In response, Auto-Owners questioned whether Shimko really spent 700 hours on the suit, noting that its attorneys only spent about 504 hours on it.  "For plaintiff's counsel to allege that he spent 200 more hours is inconceivable and suggests that plaintiff's counsel's stated time is overstated," the insurer wrote.

It also argued that Shimko's proposed hourly rate is excessive for solo practitioners in Ohio and that the jury didn't provide for litigation expenses to be recovered.  The insurer also disputed that any attorney fees should be granted, arguing that the evidence did not back up an award for punitive damages.  "There is absolutely no evidence in the record of conduct on behalf of defendant that can be remotely categorized as being malicious," Auto-Owners wrote.  It also has filed a motion for a new trial, arguing that the jury's verdict "should have shocked the conscience of the court."

NFL Player Must Cover Attorney Fees in Poaching Suit

May 13, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Max Jaeger, “Sanctioned NFL Player Must Cover Atty Fees in Poaching Suit” reports that New York Giants wide receiver Kenny Golladay must cover more than $15,000 in attorney fees for his former agency after flouting a subpoena in litigation over whether he was poached by a rival, a Michigan judge said.  In an order, U.S. Magistrate Judge Anthony P. Patti overruled Golladay and approved $14,929 in attorney fees to cover Honigman LLP's representation of the wideout's former agents at Clarity Sports International LLC.  The judge refused to award fees for work by Dowd Bennett LLP, finding them "excessive and redundant" of work by Honigman's lawyers.

Clarity said it cost them a little over $20,000 to get Golladay to comply with a third-party subpoena for his deposition and document production.  The agency says in a separate suit that sports memorabilia sellers helped non-party Creative Arts Agency steal Golladay from them.  The wide receiver is not a party to that suit, but he ignored a 2020 subpoena, so Clarity sued to compel.  The court hit him with sanctions for his "cavalier and reckless attitude" and ordered him to pay Clarity's legal bills for giving them the "run-around."

Golladay opposed most of the Honigman fees, arguing that partner Jeff Lamb's four hours at $580 per hour merely duplicated 19.75 hours of work that partner Andrew Clark did at $455 per hour.  But the court disagreed.  "Although much of attorney Lamb's relevant work appears to have involved review and conference with other attorneys, the court considers such collaboration between partners and associates typical and substantive, as opposed to duplicative and redundant," Judge Patti wrote.

That was "especially true" given Clark was out on leave for two months, the judge said.  He also approved 11 hours that associate Nicholas Burandt contributed at $350 an hour.  Some work was duplicative, however, and the judge denied $5,400 to Dowd Bennett for the roughly 7.5 hours each contributed by Dowd Bennett partner John D. Comerford and associate James B. Martin, who charged $420 an hour and $300 an hour respectively.

Golladay argued he shouldn't have to pay their fees because Clarity retained them on a contingency basis in the underlying tortious interference case against CAA that's separately playing out in Pennsylvania federal court.  Because it is ongoing, Clarity had not "incurred" any fees yet, he argued.  "The court, however, struggles to find the logic in this latter argument, as it would imply that parties (or non-parties) would be shielded from sanctions for poor behavior whenever the opposing side has a contingency-fee relationship," Judge Patti said in his order.

Instead, the judge said Dowd Bennett LLP's contribution amounted to sending emails to Honigman counsel and editing filings, and awarding fees would be excessive.  "Although Respondent's behavior throughout this matter has undoubtedly been unacceptable and necessitated additional work by Petitioners, that work was frustrating more so than complicated," Judge Patti said.

Judge Cuts ‘Excessive’ Attorney Fees for UBS Investor

May 11, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Jon Hill, “NY Judge Cuts ‘Excessive’ Atty Fee Sanction For UBS Investor” reports that a New York state judge ordered a UBS investor to pay $30,000 in legal costs over a rejected effort to revive his derivative suit against the bank's top officials, saying his opponents' original request for him to pay more than double that to their counsel at Sullivan & Cromwell was "excessive."  In an order, Manhattan County Supreme Court Justice Jennifer Schecter declined to grant the full fee award submitted by the UBS Group AG defendants in the case, whose Sullivan & Cromwell LLP attorneys wanted a total of more than $61,000 from plaintiff Ezra Cattan.

Their request came after the judge sanctioned Cattan last month for making what she deemed an ill-conceived motion to re-argue his case, ruling that he would have to cover his opponents' legal bills for fighting his motion.  In response, UBS' Sullivan & Cromwell team requested $45,000 for its work opposing the motion and another roughly $16,000 for its time spent preparing the fee award application.  But Justice Schecter concluded that this $61,000 total was too much.

Although Sullivan & Cromwell's opposition to Cattan's motion had been "understandably thorough" given the circumstances and "notwithstanding the quality of defense counsel's work and the reasonable though expensive hourly rates they charge, spending more than 60 hours on the opposition papers and this fee application was excessive," Justice Schecter wrote.  Cattan, for his part, had objected to the UBS defendants' $61,000 fee award request as unreasonable and urged that it be slashed to about $25,000, if not less.

Instead, Justice Schecter said that a total award of $30,000 "would be reasonable ... for having to oppose plaintiff's frivolous motion for re-argument and renewal."  Cattan's motion sought to reopen his derivative suit against top officials at UBS.  Filed in 2020, the case pinned blame on the bank's leaders — including then-CEO Sergio Ermotti — for what Cattan, a shareholder, claimed has been an "endless train" of damaging scandals, investigations and lawsuits for the bank going back more than a decade.

Justice Schecter threw out the case in December, ruling that Cattan's claims were covered by a forum selection clause in the bank's corporate charter that designated Switzerland as the proper venue.  But Cattan subsequently moved to keep the case alive by filing both a notice of appeal and a motion for re-argument.  In that February motion, he contended that the judge lacked the power to dismiss his suit on "forum non conveniens" grounds and should grant a do-over.

That challenged was slapped down last month by Justice Schecter, who said that it misconstrued her dismissal reasoning and "should never have been made."  At the same time, the judge granted a request by the UBS defendants to impose sanctions on Cattan for what they called his "frivolous" motion.  "Plaintiff shall therefore reimburse defendants for the reasonable costs and attorneys' fees incurred in opposing this motion," Justice Schecter ordered last month.

Honeywell Wants Workers to Cover Attorney Fees in ERISA Suit

May 4, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Abby Wargo, “Honeywell Wants Workers To Cover Atty Fees in ERISA Suit” reports that Honeywell International Inc. told a Michigan federal judge to grant it attorney fees after it won a retirement benefits suit against its former workers, saying the workers' unnecessary prolonging of the suit caused the company to expend additional resources that should be reimbursed.  The corporation asked U.S. District Judge Denise P. Hood to approve its request for a "carefully limited" sum of $263,485 after winning a decade-long suit against the United Autoworkers of America and Honeywell retirees.

Honeywell asked the court to approve only the payment of fees incurred during a period of several months in 2018 and early 2019, rather than the full 11 years of the lawsuit, which it told the judge is a reasonable request compared to the millions of dollars spent throughout the suit.  "Having defeated all of plaintiff's claims, Honeywell should be awarded a narrow portion of its attorneys' fees.  Specifically, the court should award Honeywell's fees most related to plaintiff's second summary judgment filing, as well as the unsupportable vesting claims that plaintiff pursued on appeal," according to the motion for attorney fees.

Honeywell said that it is proposing "voluntary concessions" to its requested award, such as excluding fees paying for the time of noncore legal team members and reducing the rates of the award to less than what Honeywell was actually paying for its lawyers.  If the award is granted, it would be only a small fraction of the millions of dollars Honeywell spent fighting the lawsuit, it said.

But Honeywell said that the plaintiffs were "unpersuaded" by the rulings and moved for summary judgment again, though they still lost. Regardless, the company's attorneys had to spend hundreds more hours on the case than was necessary, it said in the fee motion.

Judge Mulls $24M in Fees in $98M Mattel Investor Settlement

May 2, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Gina Kim, “Mattel Judge Mulls $24.5M Atty Fee Bid in $98M Investor Deal” reports that U.S. District Judge Mark C. Scarsi said he will grant final approval of $98 million in settlements resolving investors' claims that Mattel and PwC misled them by understating an income tax expense, but said he's still considering the class counsel's $24.5 million attorney fee bid.  During a hearing, John Rizio-Hamilton, who represents the class and lead investor plaintiffs DeKalb County Employees Retirement System and New Orleans Employees Retirement System, urged Judge Scarsi to approve the fee bid, which he said is 25% of the $98 million deal and consistent with the Ninth Circuit's benchmark for percentage fee awards in common fund cases.

The investors' counsel also sought $1,139,330 in expenses, plus plaintiff awards to DeKalb County and New Orleans for $8,615. Defense counsel for PwC and Mattel did not object to the fee request.  Rizio-Hamilton maintained that the reasonableness of the fee request is backed by a lodestar cross-check, which he said yields a multiplier of 2.7.  "I know it's 25% of the settlement, but it represents a 2.7 times multiplier of a lodestar calculation," Judge Scarsi began. "Why is this significant upward deviation from the lodestar reasonable in this case?"  Rizio-Hamilton said the fee bid comports with the benchmark and "if anything, it's a touch less, because we're requesting 25% of the settlement net of litigation expenses."

The lodestar crosscheck of 2.7 multiplier is actually in the middle range, and is a common figure awarded to comparable class action securities litigations, Rizio-Hamilton said.  He cited several cases, such as Vizcaino v. Microsoft Corp., where the Ninth Circuit affirmed an award of 28% of a $97 million settlement, and In re: Brocade Securities Litigation, where class counsel received 25% of a $160 million deal.

Furthermore, the recovery achieved for the class is above average considering the serious risks facing the class, justifying the fee request, Rizio-Hamilton argued.  Class counsel dedicated almost 19,000 hours into the case, and incurred more than $1.1 million in expenses to face off against well-funded, high-caliber law firms representing Mattel and PwC, he said.

The class's reaction to the requested fee has also been favorable, and no institutional investor objected to it, Rizio-Hamilton added.  Only one individual investor, James J. Hayes of Virginia, objected to the fee request, but those objections are without merit and Hayes doesn't explain why the fee request is purportedly excessive, Rizio-Hamilton said.

Judge Scarsi aired additional concerns he had with the billing rates provided in class counsel's papers, noting that there were hourly rates ranging from $300 to $425 for nonlawyer litigation staff.  "Why aren't those high?" Judge Scarsi asked Rizio-Hamilton.

Rizio-Hamilton defended the billing rates charged by nonlawyer staff, arguing that they have been repeatedly accepted by courts in connection with fee applications in similar cases across the nation and in the district.  He also cited Volkswagen "Clean Diesel" Marketing, Sales Practices, and Products Liability Litigation" In re: Volkswagen "Clean Diesel" Marketing, Sales Practices, and Products Liability Litigation in the Northern District of California, where the court found hourly rates in that case — up to $490 per hour for nonlawyer paralegals — to be reasonable.

Rizio-Hamilton further contended that the billing rates are consistent with those charged by other firms litigating national securities litigations, including the very defense counsel in the instant Mattel litigation.  "We know that because we look at the bankruptcy fee applications they submit," Rizio-Hamilton said.  "Suffice it to say, the rates that they submitted to bankruptcy courts are meaningfully higher than the rates we submit here," he said.  "On the question of nonlawyer paralegals, for instance, Munger Tolles — and I don't mean to single them out — have submitted rates between $405 to $490 in 2020 for paralegals in the PG&E bankruptcy case in the Northern District of California."

Ultimately, class counsel achieved a recovery that is meaningfully greater than what is typically achieved in comparable cases, considering the time and quality of work poured into the case for more than two years without any payment, he added.  Class counsel are only asking for a benchmark, "and not a penny more," Rizio-Hamilton said.

"I do appreciate all the arguments, as you understand, you know, I'm just trying to do the best thing for the class, which is why I'm focusing on the attorney award, and I'll give that a little more thought based on the arguments today," Judge Scarsi said.  "So the court will approve the settlement, will issue an order, and you know, the attorneys' fees may not be the 2.7 multiple, so we'll see."