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Category: Lodestar Multiplier

Class Counsel Earn $3.6M in Fees in CBS #MeToo Case

November 14, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Katryna Perera, “CBS Investors Attys Get $3.6M in Moonves #MeToo Case” reports that counsel from Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP have been awarded $3.6 million for their work securing a $14.7 million settlement for a class of CBS Corp. investors who claimed the company's former CEO Les Moonves' alleged sexual misconduct tanked the broadcasting giant's shares.  U.S. District Judge Valerie Caproni issued an order granting the attorney fee request along with $354,000 in litigation expenses.  However, she declined to award fees or expenses to Johnson Fistel LLP, which she noted did not appear as counsel to any plaintiff in the instant case or in a related matter.

Judge Caproni also granted a $2,250 service award to lead plaintiff, the Construction Laborers Pension Trust for Southern California, but declined to grant a request for $20,000 in legal fees for the lead plaintiff's outside counsel, which the order does not identify.  In awarding Robbins Geller $3.6 million in fees, the judge said the attorneys devoted more than 5,000 hours to the case, with a lodestar value of $4.6 million.  She also noted that class members filed no objections to the fees or expenses.

The $14.7 million settlement between the class and CBS was reached in April.  Investors argued that the deal was a "very good" one given that it represents between 7% and 9% of their estimated reasonably recoverable damages.  The investors alleged in their August 2018 suit that a statement Moonves made at the Variety Innovate Summit industry event in late 2017 kept CBS' share price artificially inflated until explosive July 2018 news reports detailed his alleged history of workplace sexual harassment.

Groupon Settlement Merits $4.5M in Attorney Fees

November 1, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Katryna Perera, “Attorneys in Groupon Settlement Secure $4.5M in Feesreports that lawyers representing a class of Groupon investors will receive $4.5 million in attorney fees from a $13.5 million settlement resolving allegations that Groupon misled investors about its financial health before ending its sale of physical goods and announcing the departure of two top executives.  U.S. District Judge Matthew F. Kennelly issued an order approving class counsel's fee requests along with $250,000 in litigation costs and a $5,000 service award to lead plaintiff Fadi Rahal.  The Illinois federal judge also granted final approval to the deal.

Judge Kennelly said class counsel from Glancy Prongay & Murray LLP and Kirby McInerney LLP devoted more than 4,000 hours to the case with a lodestar value of approximately $2.9 million.  Additionally, the judge said there were significant risks with continued litigation, and that the requested fee award is consistent with similar, complex class actions.

"The stakes in the action were extremely high given, among other things, the amount of money at issue, and the large size of the settlement class," the order states.   Plaintiff's counsel conducted the litigation and achieved the settlement with skill, perseverance and diligent advocacy, and they are highly experienced in the field of securities class action litigation."  Groupon and the investor class told the court in June they had reached the deal, which represents a recovery of 9.6% of the total maximum damages potentially available to shareholders. A best-case scenario would have resulted in a $140 million recovery, Rahal said at the time.

California Challenges Fee Entitlement in Tribes’ Gaming Appeal

October 28, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Caleb Symons, “California Rebuffs Tribes’ Bid for $1.1M Atty Fee in Gaming Appeal reports that California and its governor, Gavin Newsom, say five Native American tribes that earlier this year won a Ninth Circuit decision over their gaming negotiations with the state are not entitled to more than $1.1 million in attorney fees, since federal Indian law offers no such relief.  That dispute comes several months after the Ninth Circuit gave the five tribes — the Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians, the Chemehuevi Indian Tribe, the Hopland Band of Pomo Indians, the Robinson Rancheria of Pomo Indians and the Blue Lake Rancheria of the Wiyot, Yurok and Hupa Indians — major leverage in their gaming negotiations.

In the wake of that decision, in which a panel of the appellate court prohibited California from adding to the tribes' new gaming compacts any regulatory topics not directly tied to gambling, tribal leaders have sought to recoup $1,130,679 they estimated spending on the litigation.  California fired back, saying the tribes are ineligible for that relief because the federal Indian Gaming Regulatory Act contains no provision for recovering such expenses.

Nor can the tribes turn to state civil procedure to recoup their attorney fees, Newsom and other state officials argued, since the case involved only questions of the federal Indian gaming law, not state law.  The Ninth Circuit has already determined — in the 2018 case Independent Living Center of Southern California Inc. v. Kent — that such claims are valid exclusively in litigation over state law, according to California.

"The tribes' attempt to expand Kent to permit state law attorneys' fees awards in federal court cases that do not adjudicate a state law claim remains wholly without support," the state said.  In their Sept. 26 motion, the five Native tribes said their request of $1.1 million in attorney fees was based on reduced rates and reflected a proper "lodestar" amount, defined as the product of the number of hours reasonably spent on the litigation and a reasonable hourly rate for the attorneys.

That calculation, on the high end, proposes $980 per hour for Lester J. Marston of Rapport and Marston, which represents all the tribes except the Blue Lake Rancheria.  At the low end, it proposes $300 per hour for Marston's son, a law clerk at the same firm.  But even if the tribes are, in fact, eligible to recoup such expenses, California and Newsom responded, the state is immune from furnishing those funds under the 11th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

California never waived its sovereign immunity in the litigation, the state added, calling the tribes "mistaken" for contending that it set aside its immunity under a statute that allows for lawsuits against the state that are related to the federal Indian gaming act.  That statute, known as Section 98005, allows for "good faith" litigation under the Indian gaming act but does not waive California's immunity to attorney fees, according to state officials.  "Because Section 98005 is silent on attorneys' fees, the statute does not 'unequivocally' waive the state's immunity to a claim for such fees," they said.

Ninth Circuit: Minimal Fee Award Upheld in ‘Abusive’ ADA Suits

October 25, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Hanna Albarazi, “9th Circ. Slams ‘Abusive’ ADA Suits in Upholding Atty Fee Cut” reports that a Ninth Circuit panel on upheld a decision to slash attorney fees in an Americans with Disabilities Act lawsuit over a lack of accessible parking, suggesting in a scathing published opinion that the suit amounted to "abusive ADA litigation" by a serial litigant.  The circuit panel held that a California federal judge had not abused his discretion in reducing the attorney fees in an open-and-shut case over a lack of accessible parking spaces at a Los Angeles County shopping center, but the panel also used its opinion as an opportunity to rail against a perceived blight caused by serial ADA plaintiffs.

"The ADA satisfied the need for meaningful legislation for the protection of individuals with disabilities; however, one of the unforeseen consequences of this statute was the widespread abuse taking form due to the actions of serial ADA plaintiffs," wrote U.S. Circuit Judge Milan D. Smith Jr., who penned the unanimous opinion.  Smith wrote that the ability to recover attorney fees in ADA cases "has given rise to a wave of 'get-money quick' lawsuits brought by a small number of professional, serial plaintiffs."

However, enforcement of the ADA falls on persons with disabilities.  As a result, disabilities rights advocates frequently contend that bringing suit against violators increases accessibility.  Plaintiff James Shayler, who has physical disabilities that make walking and standing difficult, sued property owner 1310 PCH LLC in California federal court in November 2020, claiming its property in Hermosa Beach was in violation of the ADA and California's Unruh Civil Rights Act.

Shayler's suit went largely uncontested, resulting in summary judgment in his favor on the ADA claim and an award of injunctive relief. The court, however, declined to exercise supplemental jurisdiction over the Unruh Act.  Shayler then moved for over $34,000 in attorney fees and costs.

But U.S. District Judge George H. Wu concluded that the hourly rates and the time spent by his attorneys on the case were unreasonable given that the nature of the legal work was routine and because there had been a lack of meaningful opposition by the defendant.  Judge Wu adopted a $300 per hour blended billing rate for the work performed by Shayler's four attorneys and reduced the overall fee total by 65%.  In September 2021, Judge Wu ultimately awarded just under $10,000 in attorney fees and costs to Shayler.

Shayler quickly appealed the award, arguing that the downward reduction was unjustified.  The appellate panel affirmed the lower court's ruling.  "Given the repetitive nature of high-frequency ADA litigation, there was nothing irrational about the district court's conclusions that, in effect, much of the work here could have been performed by junior associates or even paralegals, or that much of the motion practice in the case was superfluous," Judge Smith wrote.

Judge Smith said the district court's choice of a $300 per hour blended billing rate was largely based on its finding that this was "a run-of-the-mill repeat-player ADA case lacking in legal, factual, or procedural complexity."  The district court cited decisions determining that serial ADA litigation, such as Shayler's, does not involve particularly complex work justifying partner-level billing rates, the panel said.  "A hallmark of abusive ADA litigation is the use of form complaints containing a multitude of boilerplate allegations of varying merit," the panel wrote.

Ninth Circuit: Minimal Fee Award Upheld in ‘Abusive’ ADA Suits

October 25, 2022

A recent Law 360 story by Hanna Albarazi, “9th Circ. Slams ‘Abusive’ ADA Suits in Upholding Atty Fee Cut” reports that a Ninth Circuit panel on upheld a decision to slash attorney fees in an Americans with Disabilities Act lawsuit over a lack of accessible parking, suggesting in a scathing published opinion that the suit amounted to "abusive ADA litigation" by a serial litigant.  The circuit panel held that a California federal judge had not abused his discretion in reducing the attorney fees in an open-and-shut case over a lack of accessible parking spaces at a Los Angeles County shopping center, but the panel also used its opinion as an opportunity to rail against a perceived blight caused by serial ADA plaintiffs.

"The ADA satisfied the need for meaningful legislation for the protection of individuals with disabilities; however, one of the unforeseen consequences of this statute was the widespread abuse taking form due to the actions of serial ADA plaintiffs," wrote U.S. Circuit Judge Milan D. Smith Jr., who penned the unanimous opinion.  Smith wrote that the ability to recover attorney fees in ADA cases "has given rise to a wave of 'get-money quick' lawsuits brought by a small number of professional, serial plaintiffs."

However, enforcement of the ADA falls on persons with disabilities.  As a result, disabilities rights advocates frequently contend that bringing suit against violators increases accessibility.  Plaintiff James Shayler, who has physical disabilities that make walking and standing difficult, sued property owner 1310 PCH LLC in California federal court in November 2020, claiming its property in Hermosa Beach was in violation of the ADA and California's Unruh Civil Rights Act.

Shayler's suit went largely uncontested, resulting in summary judgment in his favor on the ADA claim and an award of injunctive relief. The court, however, declined to exercise supplemental jurisdiction over the Unruh Act.  Shayler then moved for over $34,000 in attorney fees and costs.

But U.S. District Judge George H. Wu concluded that the hourly rates and the time spent by his attorneys on the case were unreasonable given that the nature of the legal work was routine and because there had been a lack of meaningful opposition by the defendant.  Judge Wu adopted a $300 per hour blended billing rate for the work performed by Shayler's four attorneys and reduced the overall fee total by 65%.  In September 2021, Judge Wu ultimately awarded just under $10,000 in attorney fees and costs to Shayler.

Shayler quickly appealed the award, arguing that the downward reduction was unjustified.  The appellate panel affirmed the lower court's ruling.  "Given the repetitive nature of high-frequency ADA litigation, there was nothing irrational about the district court's conclusions that, in effect, much of the work here could have been performed by junior associates or even paralegals, or that much of the motion practice in the case was superfluous," Judge Smith wrote.

Judge Smith said the district court's choice of a $300 per hour blended billing rate was largely based on its finding that this was "a run-of-the-mill repeat-player ADA case lacking in legal, factual, or procedural complexity."  The district court cited decisions determining that serial ADA litigation, such as Shayler's, does not involve particularly complex work justifying partner-level billing rates, the panel said.  "A hallmark of abusive ADA litigation is the use of form complaints containing a multitude of boilerplate allegations of varying merit," the panel wrote.