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Category: Fees Paid by Insurers

AIG Unit Tells Ninth Circuit Yahoo’s Fee Award is Excessive

February 3, 2021

A recent Law 360 story by Daphne Zhang, “AIG Unit Tells 9th Circ. Yahoo’s Atty Fee Award is Excessive,” reports that an AIG subsidiary has asked the Ninth Circuit to reverse Yahoo Inc.'s award of over $600,000 in attorney fees or grant a new trial altogether, arguing that the tech giant did not present the correct recoverable amount and that the district court failed to guide a jury on how to allocate and award attorney fees.

In a brief filed, National Union Fire Insurance Co. of Pittsburgh, Pa., said the tech giant was not able to show which portions of its legal fees were spent on bad faith claims.  The insurer asked the court to vacate a jury verdict that found it had acted in bad faith by failing to cover Yahoo's costs to defend a consolidated class action.  National Union said that California law has clearly stated that a policyholder seeking to recover attorney fees as bad faith damages may recover only fees spent on insurance coverage issues, not those incurred to litigate the bad faith claim itself.

The carrier said that Yahoo, however, lumped all legal fees together, including those relating to bad faith claims, which are not recoverable.  The company could not present the exact amount of its legal bills spent on coverage issues, which is the only portion of recoverable attorney fees that should have been awarded, it added.  Yahoo showed "large swaths of invoices with minimal, unexplained redactions,"  National Union said. The court should reverse the attorney fee award because the unrecoverable fees must be excluded from the damages calculation, it added.

The coverage dispute goes back to January 2017, when Yahoo filed suit alleging National Union had breached its policy by refusing to cover the company in several class actions accusing it of scanning customers' emails.  In October 2018, U.S. District Judge Edward J. Davila found that National Union largely failed to defend and indemnify Yahoo for $4 million in attorney fees that resulted from the class actions.  The judge said it was up to a jury, though, to decide whether the insurer acted in bad faith in denying coverage.

Following a five-day trial in May 2019, a jury returned a verdict finding that National Union had acted in bad faith and should foot the bill for Yahoo's attorney fees.  "The jury clearly did not perform the allocation that Yahoo neglected to perform," National Union said on Monday, adding that Yahoo's own counsel could not point out how much of the legal fees were incurred on coverage issues and what portion was spent on bad faith claims.

"The district court failed to properly instruct the jury on how to allocate, leading the jury to award 100% of the claimed fees — a plainly excessive amount," the insurer claimed.  Yahoo previously argued that it had correctly allocated the legal fees by only submitting the invoices incurred before the district court's summary judgment order that granted its coverage benefits.  National Union said that since the bad faith claims were also litigated on summary judgment, Yahoo did not conduct a proper fee allocation.  "Yahoo is not entitled to a second bite at the apple to present allocation evidence it opted not to present at trial," the carrier said.

The case is Yahoo! Inc. v. National Union Fire Insurance Co. of Pittsburgh, Pa., case number 19-16475, in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Insurer Seeks to Dodge Attorneys Fees in Overbilling Matter

January 14, 2021

A recent Law 360 story by Kevin Penton, “Insurer Seeks to Dodge Mass. Firm’s Overbilling Probe Fees” reports that an insurance company asked a Massachusetts federal court to declare that it is not responsible for paying attorney fees incurred by Thornton Law Firm LLP when the firm faced an investigation over alleged overbilling in a $300 million State Street Corp. settlement.  Continental Casualty Co. should not be obligated to pay Thornton Law the unspecified amount of fees the firm paid to its legal counsel for representation throughout the investigation, along with the unspecified amount the court ordered to be deducted from the firm's fee award to help cover the investigation's costs, according to the complaint in the District of Massachusetts.

Continental argues that Thornton Law did not take out insurance that would require the insurer to defend or indemnify the firm in the investigation.  The company noted that the investigation was not a claim triggered by an "act or omission in the performance of legal services" by Thornton Law, nor does it leave open the possibility of covered damages, according to the complaint.  The investigation's findings — that Thornton Law and Labaton Sucharow LLP repeatedly violated the rules of professional conduct in part by overbilling — meant that the insurance policy's "intentional acts exclusion" is also triggered, according to the complaint.

"The acts or omissions at issue in the special master fee investigation are not services performed by Thornton as a lawyer," the complaint reads.  "To the contrary, the special master fee investigation arose from the insured's false and misleading submission regarding its billing rates and business practices in a declaration to the court."

The underlying suit, filed in 2011, alleged that State Street swindled millions of dollars a year from its clients on their indirect foreign exchange trades over the course of a decade.  The class action resulted in a $300 million settlement between State Street and investors, and U.S. District Judge Mark L. Wolf approved $75 million in attorney fees for Thornton Law, Labaton Sucharow and Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein LLP in 2016.

The billing issues first came to light later that year in a Boston Globe report. The firms later acknowledged they overstated their billing, but claimed the $75 million fee was still proper.  Following the investigation by a special master, Judge Wolf in February reduced the firms' fees to $60 million.  Judge Wolf noted at the time that Thornton Law managing partner Garrett Bradley also signed a false fee declaration, which Bradley lamented as a "stupid mistake" when testifying in one of the case's hearings.

"The United States has a proud history of honorable, trustworthy lawyers," Judge Wolf wrote.  "However, this case demonstrates that not all lawyers can be trusted when they are seeking millions of dollars in attorneys' fees and face no real risk that the usual adversary process will expose misrepresentations that they make."

Judge Tosses Suit Seeking Coverage of Defense Fees

November 23, 2020

A recent Law 360 story by Rachel O’Brien, “Judge Nixes Suit For Crypto Co. Investor’s $728K Atty Fees,” reports that a New York federal judge tossed a lawsuit by an alleged pump-and-dump scheme mastermind asking for his attorney fees to be paid by a cryptocurrency company involved in the alleged scheme, ordering the man to pay the company's fees instead.  While Barry Honig and his business GRQ Consultants Inc. point to indemnification clauses in agreements with Riot Blockchain as proof that his legal fees should be paid, U.S. District Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald said the clauses say the opposite.

Honig, at one time the largest shareholder in Riot Blockchain, spearheaded a $27 million pump-and-dump scheme involving 10 individuals and 10 associated corporate entities, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission alleged in September 2018.  Honig and others, including former Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. chairman Phillip Frost and Riot Blockchain CEO John O'Rourke, manipulated stock prices in three microcap companies and left investors holding "virtually worthless shares," the SEC said.

In July 2019, Honig settled the SEC claims without admitted any wrongdoing, submitting to an injunction barring him from future violations of federal securities laws, a penny stock ban and further restrictions.  Honig was named in several other suits, including in five shareholder derivative actions which alleged Riot, its directors and officers and Honig violated securities laws, and that Honig bought stock from Riot to gain "control" over the company so he could violate the securities laws.

A February 2018 class action from shareholder Creighton Takata in New Jersey federal court alleged that Honig's purchase of securities was part of a "fraudulent scheme consisting of misrepresentations, omissions, and actions that deceived the investing public in violation of securities laws."  He called those allegations "a house of cards" in his October 2019 motion to dismiss, which was granted in April because the shareholders didn't show how the defendants violated anti-fraud provisions of federal securities law, the judge said then.

In the case tossed, Honig had argued that the security purchase agreements he entered into with Riot in 2017 to buy convertible promissory notes and common stock purchase warrants guaranteed that if Honig was a defendant in a lawsuit, Riot would pay his legal fees.  The indemnification clauses in the agreements, Honig argued in the April suit, meant Riot must pay the $728,000 attorney fees he incurred fighting securities fraud allegations by the SEC and in class actions.

Riot argued that Honig's claim fails because Riot isn't obligated to pay when the litigation is connected with actions "based upon ... any violations by [Honig] of securities laws or any conduct by [Honig] which constitutes fraud, gross negligence, willful misconduct or malfeasance by [Honig]."  But Honig said the carveout in the indemnification clause only applies to actual securities violations, and since some of the lawsuits are ongoing, he's entitled to advancement of legal costs.

Judge Reice Buchwald agreed with Riot that "the allegations of the underlying action — not the merits of the action — govern Riot's obligations."  Since it's the nature of the allegations that trigger the obligation to indemnify, the clauses clearly side with Riot, Judge Reice Buchwald said.  "If there were any ambiguity, which there is not, about when the obligation to indemnify is determined (and thus whether allegations or merits control), the next sentence of Section 4.8 confirms the court's conclusion," she said.  She pointed to the section that states if an action is brought wherein the indemnity clause might be implemented, Honig must notify Riot in writing and Riot "shall have the right to assume the defense thereof with counsel of its own choosing reasonably acceptable to [Honig]."

"The logic of Section 4.8's structure is apparent," the judge said.  "The first sentence informs the parties as to whether indemnification is required.  If and when those conditions are satisfied, Honig would notify Riot, which then has the option to assume the defense.  The provision presupposes that the parties can determine, prior to that notice, whether an obligation to indemnify exists."

Judge Reice Buchwald also granted Riot's motion that Honig pay its reasonable attorney fees for this action.  Scott Carlton of Paul Hastings LLP, counsel for Riot Blockchain, told Law360 in a statement, "We are pleased with the court's careful consideration in this matter, including the awarding of attorneys' fees for Riot Blockchain as the prevailing party."

Insurers Refuse to Pay $18M in Defense Fees in Experian Class Actions

November 19, 2020

A recent Law 360 story by Joanne Faulkner, “Insurers Deny Liability in Experian’s $18M Legal Fees Suit,” reports that two insurers have told a London judge they are entitled to refuse to pay Experian's $18 million claim for coverage of its U.S. legal fees in a pair of class actions over errant credit reporting because the litigation stems from deliberate data erasure by staff at the company.  Zurich Insurance PLC and a subsidiary of SCOR said Experian's policy excludes "deliberate acts" such as those that allegedly form the basis of two major class action suits in the U.S., a newly public Nov. 13 defense said, after the company sued to claw back litigation fees.

The claims made against Experian — which said it has racked up millions of dollars in liabilities and legal costs defending the suits — were for statutory damages according to the U.S. Fair Credit Reporting Act.  If Experian is liable, it is the result of a "wilful (or reckless) failure on the part of an employee or employees … to comply with the FCRA," the defense said. 

Experian says in its October High Court suit that it paid a class of more than 100,000 payday loan customers $24 million to settle a lawsuit in January brought by lead plaintiff Demeta Reyes.  A $5 million deal was reached with consumers in the so-called Smith action.  The customers said they were harmed by inaccurate reporting of their credit history.  The insurers said that Experian's alleged liability in the Reyes action arises out of the deleting of loan records —  particularly those held by an entity called Delbert Services Corp.  In the Smith action, it is connected to the re-reporting of records relating to loans held by CashCall Inc.  Experian directors were involved in the decision-making in both incidents, the insurers said.

From April 2015 through April 2016, Experian held a complex multitiered insurance "tower" consisting of a primary policy from XL Specialty Insurance Co. and several layers of excess coverage, Experian says.  Zurich and SCOR unit General Security Indemnity Co. of Arizona are each liable for half of a $20 million excess policy, which kicked in once the underlying coverage was depleted, Experian says.  So far the insurers have only paid out a slice of the $20 million excess that Experian says it is entitled to, the company alleges.

Experian is also seeking a declaration from the court that the insurers will cover financial penalties that Experian may have to pay as a result of investigations into a 2015 cyberattack.  The two insurers said that coverage is provided for regulatory fines and penalties, but Experian must prove that any sanction is "lawfully insurable."

Experian says it has run up costs of more than $32 million defending two major related class suits.  Thousands of consumers successfully argued that Experian's failure to delete certain negative information in their consumer credit reports caused them harm.

Experian says it should be able to recover $18 million in legal costs from the insurers under its third-party liability and first-party insurance policies.  The suit also name-checks an action brought by Carolyn Clark alleging the company violated the FCRA, which ended up costing Experian more than $21 million. The company says it could be entitled to an indemnity of $14.3 million from the insurers to cover the costs from that case.

Insurer Wins Recovery of $5.5M in Defense Fees

September 7, 2020

A recent Law 360 story by Daphne Zhang, “Insurer Win ‘Incompetent’ Atty Fight to Recoup $5.5M,” reports that a California federal judge axed a claims handler's suit seeking additional coverage of its legal bills from an insurer that it says hired a bad lawyer to fend off underlying litigation involving a car crash, ruling instead in favor of the insurer's counterclaim to recoup over $5.5 million in defense and arbitration costs it paid.  U.S. District Judge Janis L. Sammartino said that American Claims Management Inc.'s coverage claims are barred by Allied World Surplus Lines Insurance Co.'s policy exclusions, and since some of the claim handler's legal bills should not have been covered, the insurer is entitled to recoup its over $5.5 million payment from ACM.

Allied World has sufficiently shown that its policy's claims services and dishonest acts exclusion precludes coverage since ACM acted in bad faith and concealed information in its handling of insurance claims in the underlying case, Judge Sammartino said.  The judge dismissed ACM's allegation that Allied World breached its duty of defense because the claims handler failed to show that attorney Alan Jampol of Jampol Zimet, appointed by Allied World to defend ACM in the underlying suit, was incompetent or inexperienced, according to the order.

ACM processed claims for QBE Insurance Corp. As of October 2010, it retained Allied World to insure its work for up to $5 million and contracted with other insurance companies for an additional $10 million in coverage.  In the underlying case, a driver insured by QBE crashed into a vehicle and injured a family.  When processing the injured family's claim, ACM missed a March 2011 deadline that would have capped QBE's exposure at $30,000.  The family subsequently won a $21 million jury verdict in the underlying case, which QBE later settled for $15 million, according to filings.

QBE then offered to settle with ACM for $15 million, but Allied World allowed the matter to go to arbitration.  In July 2017, an arbitration panel awarded QBE more than $18.5 million, according to court papers.  With the portion of the over $5 million policy that Allied World paid and the $10 million paid by its other insurance carriers, ACM wanted Allied World to pay the remaining $4.9 million of the arbitration award and sued them.

In the order, Judge Sammartino said that Allied World's policy exclusions bars coverage for acts of bad faith and dishonest conduct in handling an insurance contract, and QBE specifically alleged that ACM handled the car accident claim in bad faith.  The judge said the arbitration panel in the underlying case found that ACM "chose to withhold from QBE evidence of its own negligent performance," provided QBE with "inadequate and misleading" information, and that ACM "has repeatedly tried to conceal and misrepresent the fact of timely receipt of the letter demand" from the injured family.

Additionally, the court has found that Jampol was competent at the time of his appointment by Allied World to defend ACM, Judge Sammartino said. ACM has alleged that Jampol was inexperienced with car accident cases and had never handled a "bad-faith" case as complicated as the underlying suit, according to filings.

"Plaintiff gives no reason why an auto accident case such as this would be more complex than other bad-faith insurance claims that Jampol had experience handling.  Nor does plaintiff identify any skills or knowledge necessary to litigate an auto accident case that Jampol lacked," the judge said.