Fee Dispute Hotline
(312) 907-7275

Assisting with High-Stakes Attorney Fee Disputes

The NALFA

News Blog

Category: Fee Economics / Fee Market

NALFA Releases 2020 Average Hourly Rates in Litigation

February 9, 2021

NALFA recently completed its 2020 Litigation Hourly Rate Survey.  This billing rate survey was conducted via email over the last few months.  Over 2,000 civil litigators from across the U.S. participated in this hourly rate survey.  Survey participants included litigators (plaintiff and defense) from partner to associate levels from large law firms to solo shops.  With exactly 2,465 survey participants answering 8 rate questions, we have 19,720 rate data points to analyze.

We are working on tabulating all the hourly rate data points and analyzing and comparing hourly rate data sets.  The full survey report with findings will be available for purchase soon.  This survey report will be free for survey participants, members, faculty, and fellows.  Below are the 2020 approximate average hourly rates for defense and plaintiffs in regular/routine litigation and complex litigation:


"From these national averages, we see that plaintiffs' rates are, on average, $20 an hour higher than defense rates in both regular and complex litigation.  Both plaintiffs' and defense rates rise $30 and hour, on average, from regular to complex litigation.  Also, the variance between litigation sides and litigation type only spans $50 an hour at most, on average," said Terry Jesse, Executive Director of NALFA in Chicago.

Defense Firms and Clients Can Boast About Attorney Fee Wins

January 25, 2021

A recent Law.com story by Christine Simmons, “Both Law Firms and Clients Can Boast About Fee Wins,” reports that, several organizations have reported that, despite the Am Law 200’s worst fears, the legal industry enjoyed growth in 2020.  Citi Private Bank Law Firm Group and Hildebrandt Consulting have projected mid-single digit growth in revenue and mid to high single digit growth in profits. 

Last year, large firms managed to raise rate about 5%, according to James Jones, a senior fellow at the Georgetown Law Center on Ethics and the Legal Profession.  That’s remarkable considering the chaotic and depressing environment of 2020, and even more remarkable that the average annual rate increase for firms since 2008 has been about 3%.

But weren’t general counsel in cost control mode?  After all, according to survey data collected in June 2020 from 223 corporate legal departments, 89% of respondents said controlling outside counsel costs was a high priority.  So what gives?  How could law firms push through high rates at a time of such fee pressure?

Reconciling legal departments’ pressing need to cut costs with law firms’ revenue, profit and rate growth in 2020 requires a closer look at law firm segmentation, sector performance and the trajectory of the year.  But in the legal industry, 2020 is also a story about demand and the benefits of close cooperation on fee agreements, allowing both law firms and legal departments to have some bragging rights.

The Conversation

The lucrative year extended up and down the Am Law 100 and likely into the Second Hundred, but it came at different client relations strategies.  For the elite, rate and fee pressure was so little they could give out double bonuses to associates without billable hour requirements.  Wall Street firms and the Am Law 20 saw the benefit of ‘fight to quality” during an unpredictable year in business.  Meanwhile, some law firms did work with their clients on a mix of fee strategies and arrangements, to the benefit of both.

For instance, at Akerman, ranked No. 88 in the Am Law 100 last year, CEO Scott Meyers said collections remained steady last year, although Akerman worked with its clients to help them meet their own budgets while paying their legal bills.  “We’re close to our clients,” he said.  “We reached out to each one to understand, ‘what’s your financial position?  What’s your cash position?  What can you do, what can’t you do?’”  At the end of the financial year, the firm said it had a 6.5% increase in gross revenue in 2020.

Fee pressure, of course, depends on the industry.  And those with insurance industry clients and municipal clients are among those seeing the most discount pressure.  Mark Thompson, president and CEO of Marshall Dennehey Warner Coleman & Goggin, said while the firm’s hospital clients have returned to their pre-COVID payment rates, the firms’ base of municipal government clients haven’t yet returned to pre-COVID fee arrangements as a result of financial distress. “That is going to remain a problem going forward,” Thompson said in a Dec. 22 article. 

But nearly all sectors saw pressure in the beginning of the pandemic. At General Motors, the automaker reached out to the 19 firms on its panel of “strategic legal partners.” The second quarter presented an enormous, worrisome question mark, and the automaker—like so many businesses of all sizes—was looking to preserve cash.

GM general counsel Craig Glidden said the company didn’t know what would happen in the auto markets, which meant asking firms for help. And those firms stepped up, agreeing to deferred billing and alternative fee arrangements to relieve some of the company’s pressure.

The Significance

Yes, law departments are seeking high cost savings.  The 2021 Report on the State of the Legal Market from Thomson Reuters and Georgetown Law said spending on outside counsel did, in fact, decrease in the second and third quarters of 2020.  The report said 81% of legal departments found that general enforcement of billing guidelines, including reductions of invoice fees and expenses, was the most effective way to keep billing down.  Meanwhile, 53% of respondents requested standard discounts; 49% of respondents reduced timekeeper rate increases; and 45% used volume discounts.

At the same time work, the report shows that the average daily demand for law firm services per lawyer, based on billable hours, increased in the second half of the year, picking up in November to almost match the previous two year average.  So what happened to the portrait of the general counsel scrutinizing every line item and grilling firms about rate increase and discounts?

That picture is becoming increasingly faint.  Instead, the portrait emerging from 2020 is one of cooperation and demand.  Clients rushed to law firms for urgent legal advice during the pandemic, including counseling for workplace laws, PPP loans, restructuring and data security concerns.  Secondly, the circumstances from the pandemic gave rise to conversations about pricing, driving both sides of the law firm-client relationship to seek common ground—both in the form of tried-and-true alternative fee arrangements and those that reflect a more innovative approach.

Law firms have some leverage.  Just because a client wants a discount doesn’t mean a firm has to provide it.  “Clients understand the difficulty of onboarding new external counsel,” says McKinsey & Co. senior partner Alex D’Amico.  “There’s a real cost to bringing on a new firm.”

Defense Rates Expected to Rise at Lower Pace in 2021

January 15, 2021

A recent Legal Intelligencer story by Andrew Maloney, “Rate Pressure and Rising Expenses Are Expected to Challenger Firms in 2021,” reports that law firms may have weathered the COVID-19 financial storm last year, but firm leaders and legal observers say economic pressures could bear down again in 2021, including increased expenses, rate pressure and cash-strapped clients.

Big Law likely won’t be able to count on government loans this time , either.  Overall, firms and analysts are optimistic about business this year.  Firms mostly said they expect a return to some version of normalcy by the second or third quarter of the year, according to a report this week from Thomson Reuters and Georgetown Law’s Center on Ethics and the Legal Profession.

At the same time, the pandemic “is likely to continue to pose economic challenges for law firms” this year, the report said, even as vaccines are being distributed en masse.  “First, it is not clear that the same tools used by firms to address the crisis since March will be as readily available in 2021.  Some law firms may well not enter the new year with the same cash cushions they had from 2019,” the report stated.  It notes many firms used the pandemic to increase billing and collections efforts, and as a consequence, may not have as much on-hand heading into this year as usual.

In addition, there’s growing concern about the ability to raise rates this year, while corporate legal departments, with 2021 budget goals, are looking for areas to trim.  ”It may be harder to implement the same level of rate increases at the end of 2020 that firms enjoyed at the end of 2019,” the authors added.

James Jones, a senior fellow at the Georgetown Law Center on Ethics and the Legal Profession and lead author of the report, said he was “dubious” firms could boost rates at the same level they did last year—about 5%.  The average annual rate increase for firms since 2008 has been about 3%, he said.

Jones also pointed to a recent Thomson Reuters survey of more than 200 legal departments that found about 89% said holding down outside counsel costs was one of their highest priorities for 2021.  He noted that corporations have significantly increased personnel whose job is to oversee outside counsel agreements.  According to Reuters’ Legal Department Operations Index, about 57% of companies had people in those roles in 2019. In 2020 that number shot up to 81%.  “So, given the economic uncertainties and enormous pressure that companies are under, I would be surprised if they sit still for a 5% increase,” Jones said in an interview.

Joshua Lorentz, a partner at Dinsmore & Shohl who chairs the firm’s finance committee, said the firm ended 2020 “on a solid note” and expects 2021 to be a “net gain” for business.  But he said one wrinkle to the budgeting process this year is figuring out where to set rates, as clients try to forecast how much COVID-19 will alter their bottom lines again.  “I don’t know that a majority of companies are asking for discounts, but perhaps discounts for new work, COVID discounts. For some clients, we’re willing to lean into that,” Lorentz said.

He said the firm is evaluating which clients needed breaks in 2020 and having discussions about their projections for 2021.  ”And with all that information, we’re able to see who needs us to lean in, who appears to be weathering the COVID situation.  Then we try to budget conservatively on top of that,” he said.  As an example of that conservative budgeting approach, Lorentz said Dinsmore is preparing this year’s numbers as if expenses such as conferences and business travel will still go forward as they would in a pre-pandemic year.

“And if it ends up that things get canceled in February and March and in the summer, then it’s additional profit for the partnership and the attorneys,” he said.  “But if we don’t budget for it, and things suddenly get clear, it’s tough to go find the money.”

Rising Expenses

The Georgetown and Thomson Reuters report noted that “almost all firms” significantly reduced costs by being more efficient about physical office space, staffing, in-person meetings and business travel in 2020, and such drastic changes could amount to a “tipping point” that permanently alters how firms do business.

Lathrop GPM could be one of those firms. Managing partner Cameron Garrison said this week that while he hopes to have a firmwide return to in-person work later this year, “I do expect that our typical work week may look very different once we return to the office.”  He said in an email that’s a result of the firm likely continuing to leverage remote work options for its staff.

At the same time, for many firms, the savings created through remote work and reduced travel are likely a one-time deal.  “I think the challenge that we’re going to have in 2021 is the very sharp expense reductions that we saw when we went into lockdown.  Those expense reductions—they’re not going to repeat, and we’re going to see our expense numbers rising again,” said Michael McKenney, managing director of Citi Private Bank’s Law Firm Group.  “So that margin expansion that we saw is unlikely to repeat.”

However, McKenney said many firms are “very, very strong” in terms of how much cash they have on-hand entering 2021.  He noted rate increases have been “very steady” since the financial crisis of 2008, and there are plenty of signs COVID-19 won’t hamstring the market this year the way it did in 2020.  “The outlook, particularly if vaccine distribution is handled better than it has been initially, is for a fairly vigorous rebound in a level of activity,” McKenney said, noting that some of the most leveraged practices that were hit hard almost a year ago are starting to come back.

“We saw corporate M&A shut down, capital markets activity was reduced, litigation was hampered because it was very hard to take depositions.  Juries were not sitting,” he said.  “Those things have begun to reopen, and people are doing them very successfully virtually.  Corporate M&A is back up, capital markets is back up, so many of our leverageable practices—practices that generate strong hours—are coming back.”  Garrison, the Lathrop firm leader, said the long-term economic and societal effects of COVID-19 are still unknown.  But one area that could pick up as a result of economic pain in the short term is pro bono.

“While not an economic challenge, I also believe that firms will be challenged with increased pro bono requests due to an increase in people facing financial hardship,” he said.  “We are very focused on balancing the pro bono time we can offer to support our communities while increasing the support that we add to our clients.”

Year-End Fee Collection Remain Steady in COVID-19 Era

January 1, 2021

A recent Law.com story by Justin Henry, “Pandemic Be Damned, Year-End Collections Are Steady (So Far)” reports that despite the great anxiety that roiled the legal industry throughout 2020, fee collections at law firms have largely returned to pre-pandemic levels as the fourth quarter comes to a close, law firm leaders and industry observers said, thanks to the successful shift to remote work and a diversity of practice areas bringing in revenue.  As 2020 ends, many firms are now preserving resources to give themselves a head start in 2021.

The fourth quarter is always a high-pressure time to collect fees from clients, especially in a year defined by economic uncertainty.  But the legal industry had one of the most successful rebounds from the pandemic-fueled economic downturn that began in the spring, and the financial strain that many forecasted proved to be short-lived.

At many law firms, however, the results of 2020’s economic turmoil won’t be known until January, with much of collections coming in these last days of the year.  Asked to comment on the net impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their firms’ bottom lines, many firm leaders said to call back in January.  “Our results depend on dollars in the door by a certain date and, not surprisingly, the last few weeks of the year are always important, but it’s always a little hard to predict,” said Tom Froehle, co-chair of Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath, which formed in 2020 out of the combination of Faegre Baker Daniels and Drinker Biddle & Reath.

While instituting flexible fee arrangements has played an important role in firms maintaining close relationships with clients throughout the pandemic, firm leaders said for the most part they had returned to normal by the closing weeks of 2020, with the exception of a few more economically precarious practice areas.

G. Mark Thompson, president and CEO of Marshall Dennehey Warner Coleman & Goggin, said the “vast majority” of his firm’s clients that requested payment discounts and deferrals have returned to pre-COVID payment agreements. The firm’s hospital clients and municipal government clients were among those that asked for discounts and deferrals on their fee payments as a result of the pandemic and its financial impacts.

Thompson said while the firm’s hospital clients—which requested flexible fee arrangements due to a downturn in elective surgeries amid an inundation of COVID-19 patients—have returned to their pre-COVID payment rates, Marshall Dennehey’s base of municipal government clients haven’t yet returned to pre-COVID fee arrangements as a result of financial distress.  “That is going to remain a problem going forward,” Thompson said.  Thompson added that one of the ways Marshall Dennehey has braced itself for economic uncertainty is having a diversified set of practice areas.  “That’s given us a competitive advantage that we’re hoping to leverage and expand moving forward,” he said.

Brad Hildebrandt, chairman of Hildebrandt Consulting, said the majority of practice areas that struggled as a result of the pandemic-induced recession—like M&A work, business transactions and in-person litigation—have successfully rebounded by the fourth quarter as attorneys and their clients adapted to a virtual work environment.

The legal industry is historically one of the fastest to rebound from a recession, and this remained true in 2020, Hildebrandt said, due in large part to the reduction in expenses that came with the shift to remote work, combined with a diverse set of high-performing practice areas, like health care and bankruptcy.

“The way the large firms have performed is actually pretty remarkable,” Hildebrandt said.  “It turns out as the last quarter came about, many of the practices were showing a return, like M&A and private equity.  Most firms at the end of the year are going to have increased revenue or at least the same revenue, and profits are going to be very high.”  Some industry observers said firm leaders may be looking to hold onto partner distributions heading into 2021 so they can preserve cash flow into the first quarter, which is historically a lower-performing period—recession or not.

Jeff Lowe, global practice leader of legal search firm Major, Lindsey & Africa, said many firms are less concerned about end-of-year cash flow than they are about setting themselves up financially for a successful 2021.  “If you’ve already had a great year, it just puts pressure on your next year,” Lowe said.  “They would rather know they have accounts receivable coming in in January when it’s going to count toward next year.  It’s sort of like starting the new year with a head start.”

Demand for Contingency Fees Grows Amid Pandemic

November 30, 2020

A recent Law.com story by Dan Roe, “Demand for Contingency Fees in Business Litigation Grows Amid Pandemic,” reports that contingency fees are not only confined to personal injury matters.  In the midst of the recession and pandemic, some firms are increasingly taking on contingency fee matters in business litigation and commercial cases.  Business owners who don’t have the cash on hand to front litigation costs are turning to law firms that work on contingency and are willing to absorb case costs, say firm leaders, who report a rise in contingency fee inquiries since the beginning of the pandemic.

Morgan & Morgan is one of the largest personal injury firms in the country, but it also has a 24-lawyer group dedicated to business disputes.  William B. Lewis, the firm’s business trial group co-managing partner, said the practice has seen a 20% to 25% increase in contingency cases — the only type they do — since the pandemic began.  The firm recently hired an associate out of law school to join the group and plans to hire three or four additional attorneys in the next six months.

The cost of hiring an hourly law firm or trying a case can exceed the cash positions of many businesses with legitimate disputes, said Lewis in an interview.  “Trying a case can cost almost as much as everything leading up to it,” Lewis said.  “Even in a two year litigation cycle, it could be $300,000 in attorney’s fees to try a case.  There are pressure points for folks to settle even if they have a valid, strong claim.  We allow clients to try cases because they don’t have to pay huge amounts to get cases in front of a jury.”

Commercial litigation boutique Cain & Skarnulis in Austin, Texas, is also taking an increased number of cases on contingency.  “There are some good business contingency fee cases coming,” founding partner Steve Skarnulis said in an interview.  “I’d estimate that over the last six months we’ve seen inquiries for at least twice as many contingent fee cases and have probably taken 25% more than we normally would.”

And in New York, the commercial litigation boutique The Stolper Group is also seeing more contingency fee questions than usual.  “There’s definitely been an uptick in inquiries,” founding partner Michael Stolper said in an interview.  “Those who do commercial contingency have to be very selective in cases so I wouldn’t say we’re doing more or less than before, but there have been a lot more inquiries now during the pandemic.”

Financial hardship and disputes that stem from it are driving demand for contingency fee arrangements, firm leaders say.  “We’ve had investment loss cases, securities cases where brokers mismanage money and dump everything into an account after the pandemic when they didn’t have the authorization from the client to do so, an uptick in legal malpractice, and real estate commission cases,” Lewis said about the type of matters Morgan & Morgan has handled on contingency.

The firm’s business trial group is also representing community associations in construction defect claims because of the high costs involved in litigating and the fact that community associations hesitate to shift those costs onto their members, Lewis said.  At Cain & Skarnulis, landlords are turning to the litigation firm to handle disputes with commercial tenants on a contingency fee basis, Skarnulis said.

Firms that specialize in commercial contingency may offer a number of fee arrangements, based on the details of the case.  Tiered fee arrangements such as those at Morgan & Morgan’s business trial group may charge 25% to 35% for an early resolution, whereas a more time-consuming trial may net the firm 35% to 45% of a judgment.  Other firms engage in hybrid arrangements, where attorneys charge a reduced hourly rate and a smaller percentage of a recovery.

Clients may look to firms to absorb case costs as well.  Court costs and associated fees such as electronic document management can cost in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, Lewis said, so firms may also agree to front those costs in exchange for a higher percentage of the recovery.

Big Law firms may not be promoting contingency arrangements, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t doing them, said Davie, Florida-based legal consultant Joe Ankus.  “I do think some of largest firms in the world will take on a contingency case if they believe at the outset the odds of recovery or settlement justify taking the risk,” he said.  “Twenty-five years ago, that wouldn’t have happened at Am Law 100 firms.  Now, people have adjusted to the new normal.”  The prospect of collecting significant damages against a major corporate defendant — and the possibility of punitive damages — may entice large firms that have historically abstained from contingency cases, he added.

Meanwhile, Skarnulis said he’s seeing traditional plaintiff’s firms — more adept at selecting contingency cases than hourly firms — get involved in contingency business litigation, as well as mid-size firms that specialize in commercial litigation.

The 18-attorney Miami litigation boutique Podhurst Orseck is handling contingency cases related to the pandemic, such as business interruption cases against insurance companies.  “It’s a huge financial and time commitment, putting our resources into claims on a complete risk basis,” partner Steven Marks said in an October interview.  “On the opposite side, if we’re successful, it’s very good for the firm.”

Marks said the firm’s historical contingency revenues make up 70% to 80% of the firm’s total revenue, while comprising about 50% of cases.  Overall, the economic downturn from COVID-19 has accelerated an ongoing trend, paved by personal injury firms, to extend the realm of contingency work, said Ankus.  “If you were to talk to me 25 years ago and say, ‘Joe, how many law firms are doing contingency work?’ I’d have told you none or less than 5%,” he said.  “Today, the number has exponentially increased to where many firms, more often than not, will readily take on a contingency matter.”